Northern Garden

Garden Gallery Two


The following two images are of a delightful little flower called a Bartonia. It is easily grown from seed directly sown into the flowerbed in the spring. The height is about 45 cm (1 1/2 feet) so it makes a lovely plant either for the front of a bed with taller plants or for the interior of a bed of smaller plants. The bright yellow flowers are very cheerful to look at, particularly in mass plantings.

bartonia - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez
bartonia - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


Golden Lotus Vine (Lotus berthelotii). Many of you are familiar with this plant and it's close relative the Red Lotus Vine as fillers in hanging baskets and containers. The silver-green leaves of the Red Lotus Vine are more needle-shaped, the plant has a ferny appearance and if grown in a warm sunny location, produces red flowers. The Golden Lotus Vine has the same silver-green leaves but they are flatter and the plant produces these striking "parrot's beak" golden flowers if given a warm, sunny location. It is often a little more difficult to find than the red-flowered variety but in my opinion, is very well worth looking for. I prefer the appearance and find it flowers a little more easily for me than the red one. I have good luck with them in baskets hanging in front of the south wall of a building and also in a free-standing basket stand.

Golden lotus vine - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


Morden Blush Rose. This is a beautiful and very hardy rose, easily available on it's own root (not grafted). It seems to withstand severe weather conditions (heat, rain, wind) very well and has come through several of our cold prairie winters here with temperatures down to 40 degrees below zero with only moderate snow cover. Some mulching in the fall if planted near a building is advisable once the ground has frozen.

Morden Blush rose - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


This gardener made very effective use of a bit of space along the south-facing wall of a garage by adding some good soil and a couple of trellises. It is filled with sun-loving plants including columbines, delphiniums and the Morden Blush rose pictured above. The trellises are used for hanging pots and give a little shade from the hottest afternoon sun in the summer. The wooden supports across the front are also used for hanging baskets. In front of the trellised section there is a bed designed for low-growing, drought-resistant rock garden plants. This is a relatively small area, but with this design the gardener is able to have a wonderful display of many plants.

Trellis garden - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


This gardener has a lot of lawn and found it tedious to trim around this large accent boulder at the front of the property. It was a simple matter to make a small flower bed around the rock and plant it with some colourful annual bedding plants and a few ground covering perennials. A plastic edging strip keeps the lawn and flowers from encroaching on each other. The big yellow marigolds are particularly cheerful to look at on cloudy days.

Rock planting - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


Echinacea purpurea "Bright Star". I avoided growing this plant for several years as I was dubious about its hardiness. Finally, about 4 years ago I broke down and bought one plant. This past summer it flowered for me for the first time and put on a wonderful show. All stages of this plant are interesting. The large leaves make a beautiful accent in the back of the bed even when the plant isn't in flower. I have it planted along the south wall of a building which is on a large gravel pad so it uses a lot of water, but it seems to appreciate the good drainage and the heat. There is some shade from the hot mid-late afternoon sun. The flower buds are most interesting to watch as they open, which they do fairly slowly.

Echinacea - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


Liatris spicata (Gayfeather, Blazing Star). This is a very showy plant that has the unusual habit of opening its flowers from the top of the spike down, rather than starting at the base of the stem and opening them progressively towards the end as most other plants. They are fairly tall - reaching 2 to 3 feet. They make excellent cut flowers but you will need to change the water frequently. The flowers are also used in dried arrangements. Liatris will spread to make a fairly sizeable clump so it is best planted as an accent plants. There is a purple variety and a white one. It is grown from bulbs planted in the spring, but you can also find it potted in some nurseries. Plant in sun or light shade (the best ones I've seen have been pretty well in full sun). The purple variety is one of the recommended substitutes for lythrum (purple loosestrife) which is now considered a noxious weed in most parts of Canada.

Liatris - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


Cerinthe 'major'. This is a very interesting plant I found last spring. The leaves are silvery-blue-green in colour and somewhat fleshy. The tubular purple flowers form in clusters surrounded by colourful blue-green bracts. The plant likes full sun. I grew mine in a medium-sized pot, not realizing how large it would eventually get but it seemed to perform very well in spite of being crowded, although it did require a lot of water. The branches drooped down over the sides then curled up at the ends. If I can find it next year I will probably get more than one so I can try it in a couple of different situations. A member of the borage family, it won't winter outdoors in my area but may where the climate is more Mediterranean.

Cerinthe - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez


Rudbeckia fulgida (Black-eyed Susan). These are wonderfully cheerful flowers that, in mass plantings, brighten any area even on the cloudiest days. They like full sun but will tolerate partial shade.

Rudbeckia - copyright 2000 by Hallie du Preez

All of these photographs were taken and are copyright by
Buddy & Hallie du Preez, all rights reserved.


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